Discounted members places for DHA2014

ADHO, the Association of Digital Humanities Associations (in which the aaDH is associated) has a new discounted members category, which is a good way to join the aaDH.  It costs about $45 to join, but this is without the subscription to LLC.

And if you join aaDH, you get a discount of $150 to register for DHA2014 plus a similar discount for the major international DH conference in Switzerland this year.

More details here:
http://aa-dh.org/2014/01/aadh-new-discounted-membership-categories/

A3DHA

CFP: DIGITAL HUMANITIES AUSTRALASIA 2014: Expanding Horizons

Call for Papers, Posters and BoFs.

DIGITAL HUMANITIES AUSTRALASIA 2014: Expanding Horizons

The Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (aaDH) is pleased to announce its second conference, to be held at The University of Western Australia, 18-21 March, 2014.

The aim of DHA 2014 is to advance digital methods, tools and projects within humanities research and develop new critical perspectives. The conference will provide a supportive, interdisciplinary environment to explore and share new and advanced research within the digital humanities.

The conference is sponsored by iVEC@UWA, The University of Western Australia, Edith Cowan University, Perth Convention Bureau, and the Australian Literature Westerly Centre, UWA.

HIGHLIGHTS

• CONFERENCE WEBSITE: http://dha2014.org
• CALL FOR PROPOSALS CLOSES: 14 September 2013
• NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE: 14 October 2013
• REGISTRATION NOW OPEN: http://dha2014.org/registration

PROPOSALS

The conference will feature long and short papers, posters and workshops, and informal ‘birds of a feather’ discussions. We invite proposals on all aspects of digital humanities, and especially encourage papers showcasing new research and developments in the field and/or responding to the conference themes.

Proposals may focus on, but need not be limited to:

1. WORKING WITH TEXT such as;

• Critical text editing and electronic editions
• Digitisation, text encoding and analysis
• Text mining in historical scholarship
• Book history, and digitising the book
• Computational stylistics and distant reading
• Digital curation and archives for cultural materials

2. NEW MEDIA and the DIGITAL such as;

• Computational approaches in new media and Internet studies
• The digital in culture, creativity, arts, music, performance

3. METHODS, APPROACHES, USERS such as;

• Crowd-sourcing scholarship in the humanities
• Quantitative methods in humanities research
• Code studies, and code in the humanities
• Mapping and spatial visualisation
• Human Computer Interaction (HCI) in digital humanities research
• Gaming for learning, serious gaming, and game archiving
• Archaeology using digital methods including marine archaeology

4. WORKING WITH DATA

• Modelling humanities data
• Linked Data and the humanities

5. BUILDING the DH COMMUNITY and PRESENCE

• Measuring and valuing research in the digital humanities
• Institutionalisation, interdisciplinarity and collaboration
• Curriculum and pedagogy in the digital humanities
• Virtual research environments in humanities research

6. INDIGENOUS AND CROSS-CULTURAL DIGITAL RESEARCH

• Cross-cultural studies
• International comparisons

SUBMISSIONS

Abstracts of no more than 600 words, together with a biography of no more than 100 words, should be submitted to the Program Committee by 14 September 2013. All proposals will be fully refereed.

Proposals should be submitted via the online form at http://www.conftool.net/dha2014/
Please indicate whether you are proposing a poster, a short paper (10 mins + 5 mins questions), a long paper (25 mins + 5 mins questions), or birds of a feather session (60 mins). Proposals will be assessed in terms of alignment with the conference themes and the quality of research within these or related themes. Presenters will be notified of acceptance of their proposal on 14 October 2013.

PROPOSAL TYPES

1. Poster presentations
Poster presentations may include work-in-progress as well as demonstrations of computer technology, software and digital projects. A separate poster session will take place during one day of the conference, during which time presenters will need to be available to explain their work, share their ideas with other delegates, and answer questions. Presenters are encouraged to provide material and handouts with more detailed information and URLs. Poster guidelines are available on the conference website to help you prepare your poster.

2. Short papers
Short papers are allocated 10 minutes (plus 5 minutes for questions) and are suitable for describing work-in-progress and reporting on shorter experiments and software and tools in early stages of development.

3. Long papers
Long papers are allocated 25 minutes (plus 5 minutes for questions) and are intended for presenting substantial unpublished research and reporting on significant new digital resources or methodologies.

4. BoFs (Birds of a Feather sessions) are 60 minute sessions that should be used for guided discussions on one topic. BoFs are informal, open presentations for exploring key community issues and debates within the digital humanities.

Do you have an issue to discuss or are unsure how to progress a topic? For example:
• Digital humanities what are the risks and rewards? or
• Digital humanities and computer science as an interdisciplinary challenge – where to from here?

60 minutes will be provided for each session. Each speaker will have a short time to present their points for discussion and the audience should also have an opportunity to comment (recommend allocation of up to 40% of the total time available).

On behalf of the Program Committee

Professor Hugh Craig, The University of Newcastle
Dr Craig Bellamy, The University of Melbourne

Review: Sustainable data from digital research conference, Melbourne

A conference was held at the University of Melbourne in December 2011 with the theme ‘sustainable data from digital research’ organised by Dr Nick Thieberger and colleagues at the School of Languages and Linguistics with assistance from the Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative (VeRSI) and the new Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (aaDH). The Keynote for the conference was Dr Stephen Ramsay, from the University of Nebraska Lincoln in the United States, author of the recently published book ‘Reading machines: towards algorithmic criticism’. The title of Dr Ramsay’s talk was ‘Found: Data, Textuality, and the Digital Humanities’ in which he discussed ‘lists’; lists of numbers, lists of words, lists of coordinates, lists of properties.  Ramsay explained that:

These lists are often transformed into other forms — visualisations, maps, information systems, software tools — but the list remains the fundamental data structure of computing, from which most other structures are derived.

Ramsay offered some meditations on the nature of lists, and suggested ways that they lend themselves to narrative and explanation.

Ramsay was particularly impressed by the volume of conference papers that was produced by the new Espresso Book Machine, a print on demand machine at the University Library that can produce a book in a matter of minutes.  The volume contains many excellent papers on subjects such as ‘fair use’ and copyright, collaborative tools for typological research, semantic annotation for 3D museum artefacts, and language archiving and documentation technologies. The conference’s core theme was focussed upon language documentation of endangered languages in the Asian-Pacific region; thus long-term preservation and reuse of these materials is of paramount importance to this research community. The .pdf version of the book and the presentations can be downloaded from http://hdl.handle.net/2123/7890 and further printed copies can be ordered from the University of Melbourne Bookshop.

Also at the conference, the new Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (aaDH) held a reception in the beautiful Arts Hall in Old Arts at the University of Melbourne.  I as Secretary of the Association welcomed guests and explained that membership to the Association would be through LLC: the Journal of Digital Scholarship in the Humanities. Membership also came with numerous benefits such as a substantial discount to the Associations upcoming conference ‘Digital Humanities Australasia’ in Canberra in March 2012 and discounted entry to the international Digital Humanities Conference in Hamburg, Germany, July 2012.

Together the conference revealed how a specialised disciplinary group of scholars largely working on vial and urgent questions around the documentation and preservation of the recordings of endangered languages are engaging with a broader Digital Humanities community in Australia so that many of the computational methods used can be shared and applied in other disciplines. The Digital Humanities is a highly interdisciplinary endeavour party with the goal to provide a ‘methodological commons’ for the humanities to discover and use new computing methods. The more that we provide these interdisciplinary spaces, the greater the ‘technical capital’ of the humanities will grow thus opening up a more active engagement with the development of appropriate computing tools and methods to address specific humanities research questions.

Stephen Ramsay: Melbourne December 12

Title of lecture: Found: Data, Textuality, and the Digital Humanities: Please register for this Information Futures event here:

Time: Monday December 12 from 9.30 – 10.30 in the Wood Theatre, Arts West, University of Melbourne (Map: Building 148, Next to Old Arts and Baillieu Library)

(A video of a keynote talk given by Stephen Ramsay at “The Face of Text” — the third Canadian Symposium on Text Analysis (CaSTA) held at McMaster University in 2004.
___________________________________________________________

In this presentation in Melbourne, Stephen Ramsay will discuss some of the latest research in the Digital Humanities. This includes applying methods to analyse the vast array of digital collections that have been developed over past decades. These methods provide additional layers of scholarly interpretation and thus uncover new insights.

“Computational processes generate lists: lists of numbers, lists of words, lists of coordinates, lists of properties.  We transform these lists into more exalted forms — visualisations, maps, information systems, software tools — but the list remains the fundamental data structure of computing, from which most other structures are derived.  Whenever we treat the world as data, we are nearly always creating lists.

But what sort of *texts* are these, and can we consider them the same way that we consider other texts within the humanities?  In this paper, I offer some meditations on the nature of lists, and suggest that it is the paucity of information they provide — and the ways in which that paucity licenses narrative and explanation — that allows us to imagine computational representations as texts that can play a fruitful role in the wider context of humanistic inquiry

 

CFP: Digital Humanities Australasia, 28-30 March 2012

Call for Papers, Panels and Posters

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DIGITAL HUMANITIES AUSTRALASIA 2012: Building, Mapping, Connecting
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The inaugural conference of the Australasian Association for Digital Humanities
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, 28-30 March 2012

Sponsored by the Australian Academy of the Humanities and the College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University.

CONFERENCE WEBSITE: http://aa-dh.org/conference
CALL FOR PROPOSALS CLOSES: 11 November 2011
NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE: 30 November 2011
REGISTRATION OPENS: Early January 2012

The Australasian Association for Digital Humanities is pleased to announce its inaugural conference, to be held at the Australian National University, Canberra, 28-30 March, 2012. The conference will feature papers, panels, posters and associated workshops. We invite proposals on all aspects of digital humanities in Australia, New Zealand and internationally, and especially encourage papers showcasing new research and developments in the field and/or responding to the conference theme of ‘Building, Mapping, Connecting’.

Proposals may focus on, but need not be limited to:

– Institutionalisation, interdisciplinarity and collaboration
– Measuring and valuing digital research
– Publication and dissemination
– Research applications and interfaces for digital collections
– Designing and curating online resources
– Digital textuality and literacy
– Curriculum and pedagogy
– Culture, creativity, arts, music, performance
– Electronic critical editions
– Digitisation, text encoding and analysis
– Communities and crowdsourcing
– Infrastructure, virtual research environments, workflows
– Information mining, modelling, GIS and visualisation
– Critical reflections on digital humanities futures

———————-
INTERNATIONAL SPEAKERS
———————-

Julia Flanders (Brown University, USA)
Alan Liu (University of California, Santa Barbara, USA)
Peter Robinson (University of Saskatchewan, Canada)
Harold Short (King’s College London, UK and University of Western Sydney, Australia)
John Unsworth (University of Illinois, USA)

———–
SUBMISSIONS
———–

Abstracts of no more than 300 words, together with a biography of no more than 100 words, should be submitted to the Program Committee by 11 November, 2011. All proposals will be fully refereed. Proposals should be submitted via the online form at http://conference.aa-dh.org. Please indicate whether you are proposing a poster, a short paper (10 mins), a long paper (20 mins) or a panel. Presenters will be notified of acceptance of their proposal on 30 November, 2011.

—————-
TRAVEL BURSARIES
—————-

The Australian Academy of the Humanities has provided funding for travel bursaries. These will be available on a competitive basis for postgraduate students and early career researchers from Australia and New Zealand to present at the conference and participate in associated workshops. Staff from cultural institutions are also encouraged to apply. When submitting your proposal please indicate if you wish to be considered for a bursary.

————–
PROPOSAL TYPES
————–

1. Poster presentations

Poster presentations may include work-in-progress on any of the topics described above as well as demonstrations of computer technology, software and digital projects. A separate poster session will open the conference, during which time presenters will need to be available to explain their work, share their ideas with other delegates, and answer questions. Posters will also be on display at various times during the conference, and presenters are encouraged to provide material and handouts with more detailed information and URLs.

2. Short papers

Short papers are allocated 10 minutes (plus 5 minutes for questions) and are suitable for describing work-in-progress and reporting on shorter experiments and software and tools in early stages of development.

3. Long papers

Long papers are allocated 20 minutes (plus 10 minutes for questions) and are intended for presenting substantial unpublished research and reporting on significant new digital resources or methodologies.

4. Panels

Panels (90 minutes) are comprised of either:

(a) Three long papers on a joint theme. All abstracts should be submitted together with a statement, of no more than 300 words, outlining the session topic and its relevance to current directions in the digital humanities; or

(b) A panel of four to six speakers. The panel organiser should submit a 300-word outline of the topic session and its relevance to current directions in the digital humanities as well as an indication from all speakers of their willingness to participate.

———
CONVENORS
———

Dr Paul Arthur, Australian National University
Dr Katherine Bode, Australian National University

—————–
PROGRAM COMMITTEE
—————–

Dr Paul Arthur, Australian National University
Dr Craig Bellamy, VeRSI, University of Melbourne, Australia
Dr Katherine Bode, Australian National University
Prof Hugh Craig, University of Newcastle, Australia
Prof Jane Hunter, University of Queensland, Australia
Dr Sydney Shep, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Review: Digital Humanities 2011, Stanford

Digital Humanities Conference, Stanford University, June 2011

Conal Tuohy and myself recently attended the Digital Humanities conference 2011 at Stanford University in California (19-22 June). In its 23rd year, the conference is the peak conference for the application of computing to humanities research with the numerous digital humanities associations holding their annual general meetings at the event.  Papers range from encyclopaedias in the study of Egyptology, to the computational study of linguistic-style in medieval texts, to the creation of digital editions of early modern texts.   Many of the panels and papers at the conference also included a ‘community building’ aspect such as teaching digital humanities, the digital humanities and alternative academic careers, and funding the digital humanities.   The keynotes at the conference were particularly impressive and included Dr Chad Gaffield, President of the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada on Re-Imaging Scholarship in the Digital Age, David Rumsey on Reading Historical Maps Digitally, and JB Michel and Erez Liberman-Aiden, the developers of Google’s N-Gram viewer, on the quantitative analysis of millions of digitised books.

Chad Gafffield, President of the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada delivering the annual Zampoli Prize Lecture on 'Re-imagining Scholarship in the Digital Age

And as the conference has its roots in literary and linguistic computing, it is perhaps not surprising that there is a strong representation of papers dealing with issues of encoding and computational analysis of text. Geoffrey Rockwell, from the University of Alberta in Canada, discussed corpus linguistics; or the study of the entire collection of works on any given subject using computational techniques. Rather that enter a digital corpus by a facsimile, as is lamentably the case with many digitisation projects in the humanities, Rockwell discussed ways to enter a  corpus using ‘corpus interfaces’ and search and analysis tools that are better placed to impart multifaceted understandings of the nature of the human record as it interfaces with the computer.

The next Digital Humanities conference is to be held at the University of Hamburg in July 2012. http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de