Craig

This blog is about the Digital Humanities in a cultural, technical, and social sense and in terms of articles, books, and technologies

Apr 172014
 
 Posted by on April 17, 2014 digital humanities No Responses »

Dear Melbourne DH folk,

Following the DHA 2014 conference in Perth, a group of us are keen to start a
regular Melbourne get-together for people working in and around the digital
humanities, with the working title: “DH at the Pub”.

beerOur first session is proposed for Wednesday 7 May from 5:30pm at the Prince Alfred
pub (PA’s) on Grattan St, Carlton. Please spread the word to colleagues and friends
who may be interested. As an extra incentive, there will be free beers for those who
arrive early!

For our inaugural event we would like to discuss: where to meet (we want to be
Melbourne-wide, not Melbourne Uni focused so are open to suggestions); how often;
the purpose and focus of the group; what we want to be called; and how we should
communicate (a dedicated email list, Twitter, etc.). The more people who can come
along to contribute their views, the better.

Thanks – we look forward to seeing you at the first Melbourne DH at the Pub session
on 7 May!

Mike Jones

Apr 032014
 
 Posted by on April 3, 2014 digital humanities, e-learning, education No Responses »

I would like to see a future for the Digital Humanities that engages fully with eLearning. It makes absolutely no sense for the DH to exclusively collaborate with the scientific support mechanisms of eResearch (ie. infrastructure). The social sciences have done ok out of eLearning and there are also lots of opportunities for the humanities in eLearning as we have most of the worlds great content.

Content is always king, especially if it is well taught!

Mar 122014
 
 Posted by on March 12, 2014 music Tagged with:  No Responses »

Each day I ride my bicycle from Fitzroy to Footscray. 20kms round trip listening to wonderful music. I ride past shipping containers and trucks, parks, rivers, and under freeways. It’s my favorite time of the day (unlike the Modern robots in their uptight cars preparing for their next heart attack).

Mar 042014
 
 Posted by on March 4, 2014 social media No Responses »

Abstract: The internet has steadily become integrated with our everyday lives, and it is scarcely worth remarking that the quotidian footprint we leave is increasingly digital. This being the case, the question of what will happen to our digital legacy when we die is an increasing important one. Digital accounts containing emails, photos, videos, music collections, documents of all kinds, social media content, eBooks and the like, all trace the life we have led, and if they are to be conserved and bequeathed, if family and friends are to benefit from this often highly emotive and evocative desiderata, if history is to be recorded, we need to prepare these accounts and assets for the inevitability of death. A difficulty though, is that the demands of curating such a legacy are formidable, the importance of creating digital archives from personal data contained in online accounts is not well-established in the public arena, and the products and services available to facilitate this are largely inadequate. Future generations and future historians are the poorer for this. In this presentation we will point out some of the difficulties involved in curating and bequeathing a digital legacy, and suggest a partial remediation.

Our paper from CIRN Prato, 2013 is now available (Link)